Stress and performance research


The following recent article extracts (presented in date order from 2009-2000) are from peer-reviewed scientific research journals:

 

 

Vernon, Dempster, Bazanova, Rutterford, Pasqualini & Andersen (2009): “Alpha Neurofeedback Training for Performance Enhancement: Reviewing the Methodology”.

Considerable interest has been, and still is, generated by the potential performance enhancing benefits of alpha neurofeedback training (NFT) for healthy participants. A plausible rationale for such training, with an aim to improve mood and/or enhance cognition, can be made based upon what is already known of the links between alpha EEG activity and behavior. The article provides a number of suggestions and possible directions for future research.

[NB Authors Rutterford and Andersen are directors of PeakMind]

 

Ros et al (2009): “Optimizing microsurgical skills with EEG neurofeedback”.

The data set provides encouraging evidence of optimised learning of a complex medical specialty via neurofeedback training.

 

 

Angelakis et al (2007): “EEG Neurofeedback: A Brief Overview and an Example of Peak Alpha Frequency Training for Cognitive Enhancement in the Elderly”.

EEG peak alpha frequency (PAF) has been shown to correlate positively with cognitive performance. The results suggested that PAF neurofeedback improved cognitive processing speed and executive function.

 

 

Vernon (2005): “Can neurofeedback training enhance performance? An evaluation of the evidence with implications for future research”.

This review provides an examination of the literature revealed that neurofeedback training has been utilised to enhance performance from three main areas; sport, cognitive and artistic performance.

 

 

Hanslmayr et al (2005): “Increasing Individual Upper Alpha Power by Neurofeedback Improves Cognitive Performance in Human Subjects”.

Training success (extent of NFT-induced increase in upper alpha power) was positively correlated with the improvement in cognitive performance.

 

 

Hanslmayr (2004): “Increasing individual upper alpha power by neurofeedback improves cognitive performance”.

This study investigated the hypothesis whether an increased absolute alpha power or a decreased absolute theta power is capable of increasing cognitive performance. This study shows that neurofeedback training can be used to increase cognitive performance.

 

 

Vernon et al (2003): “The effect of training distinct neurofeedback protocols on aspects of cognitive performance”.

This study suggests that normal healthy individuals can learn to increase a specific component of their EEG activity, and that such enhanced activity may facilitate semantic processing in a working memory task and to a lesser extent focused attention.

 

 

Egner & Gruzelier (2003): “Ecological validity of neurofeedback: Modulation of slow wave EEG enhances musical performance”.

The study documented improvements in musical performance in a student group that received training on attention and relaxation related neurofeedback protocols.

 

 

Delong (2002): “The effects of EEG neurofeedback and neuro-cognitive processing in the educational environment of an arts-based private elementary/middle school”. [Dissertation Abstract]

The students using the EEG neurofeedback and neuro-cognitive therapy made improvement in overall academic areas and the behavioral aspects of attention problems.


Harmon-Jones (2001): "Manipulation of frontal EEG asymmetry through biofeedback alters self-reported emotional responses and facial EMG".


The study taught participant to alter the hemispheric asymmetry of frontal brain activity. Participants who succesfully shifted the asymmetry more to a left frontal activation reported more positive emotions compared to baseline during film viewing.

 

 

Boynton (2000): “The effects of EEG biofeedback on hypnagogia, creativity, and well-being”. [Dissertation Abstract]

Participants reported increased personal creativity, stress reduction, heightened self-awareness, emotional equanimity, and improved work performance, as a result of their participation in this study.

 

 

Further Reading – Peak Performance

 

 

Norris & Currieri (1999): “Performance enhancement training through neurofeedback.” In Evans & Abarbanel (Eds) Introduction to quantitative EEG and neurofeedback. San Diego, CA, US: Academic Press.

This chapter discusses the employment of performance enhancement training (PET) through neurofeedback for the optimization of personal potential in which EEG neurofeedback, as a form of operant conditioning, and how it is used to reinforce voluntary control over EEG patterns. Research related to peak performance is examined. The essentials of peak performance, factors in EEG modification as related to consciousness and motivation, brain wave states, and the capacity to shift in peak performance training preparation and performance are elaborated upon.

 

Sime (2003): “Sport psychology applications of biofeedback and neurofeedback”. In Schwartz & Andrasik (Eds) Biofeedback: A practitioner's guide (3rd ed.). New York, NY, US: Guilford Press.

Sport psychologists commonly use a variety of stress-reducing and/or confidence-building techniques (e.g., relaxation, visualization, goal setting, team building, etc.) or traditional clinical approaches (cognitive-behavioral strategies, visuomotor behavior rehearsal, hypnosis, etc.) without the benefit of psychophysiological instrumentation. It is the goal of this chapter to show that biofeedback and neurofeedback can be valuable additions to this array of techniques, both with individual athletes and (under certain circumstances) with teams or groups.

 

 

 

 

Further Reading - Stress

 

Thompson & Thompson (2007): “Neurofeedback for stress management”. In Lehrer, Woolfolk & Sime (Eds) Principles and practice of stress management (3rd ed.). New York, NY, US: Guilford Press.

This chapter looks at the history of neurofeedback and stress management, theoretical foundations, assessment, and side effects of intervention.

 

Raymond (2006): The effects of alpha/theta training on personality and mood".

The study performed a particular form of deep-state training, by rewarding the crossover of brainwaves from alpha to theta and back again. Participants who received real-feedback reported after 9 sessions feelingmore energetic, composed, agreeable, elevated and confident than participants in the mock conditions whom received shamfeedback. The latter group reported feeling more tired.



Hammond (2005): “Neurofeedback treatment of depression and anxiety”.

This paper reviews the neurofeedback literature with these problems, finding particularly positive research support for the treatment of anxiety disorders.



Harmon-Jones (2001): "Manipulation of frontal EEG asymmetry through biofeedback alters self-reported emotional responses and facial EMG".

The study taught participant to alter the hemispheric asymmetry of frontal brain activity. Participants who succesfully shifted the asymmetry more to a left frontal activation reported more positive emotions compared to baseline during film viewing.

 



 

 

 

 

 



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